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Episode 215: Conquering The World Through Dancing with Neil Jones


Learning how to dance at an early age, Neil Jones went on to make dancing his career. Determined to become the World Champion, Neil had to persevere and make sacrifices which helped develop his attitude and mentality that later became beneficial to his success. Approaching what others may call the “finish line”, Neil managed to cross over a different avenue in dancing and even started a business around his passion. In this episode, Neil talks with Adam Stott about his journey and sacrifices as a professional dancer, his transition to entrepreneurship, and the mentality and attitude he had in navigating his career.

Neil is a professional Dancer, choreographer, and multiple World dance championship title holder whose mission is to give a modern, fresher look to Ballroom dancing and teach it in a fun and exciting environment. Being in the industry as early as the age of 3, Neil witnessed how dancing evolved. Fueled to bring a new dance flavor, Neil created the UrbanBallroom where he manages an online dance community and holds dance lessons to students of different ages, backgrounds, and skill levels. Wanting to deliver the latest dance trends, Neil posts videos on different social platforms including Instagram, YouTube, Facebook, and TikTok.

Show Highlights:

  • Neil’s backstory behind achieving multiple dance trophies
  • What it takes to be a pro dancer, the journey and sacrifices
  • How Neil crossed over to media from competitive dancing
  • Neil’s attitude when he started working for a TV Show
  • Why Neil started UrbanBallroom
  • The importance of cultivating a community in business
  • Neil’s dance community membership perks and dance classes
  • What Neil envisions for UrbanBallroom and his career
  • How Neil prepared and transitioned to doing business
  • The mentality that helps you succeed in business

Links Mentioned:

Follow Neil Jones on Instagram and check out the dance classes and online community at UrbanBallroom

Transcript:

Please note this is a verbatim transcription from the original audio and therefore may include some minor grammatical errors.

Adam Stott:

Hello everybody and welcome to Business Growth secrets. You’re with Adams Stott and I’ve got a brilliant, brilliant guest that I’m super excited to introduce to you. He’s won 45 Championships in dancing, he is the star of Strictly Come Dancing, he’s uh which is Neil Jones. Done some amazing things. He’s got a business that he’s running at the moment as well called Urban Ballroom. I’ve got loads and loads that we’re going to talk about today and I’m really excited to hear what he’s got to say about running businesses being on TV, how he’s building his personal brand and building his businesses. So welcome Neil, brilliant to have you.

Neil Jones

So good. Thank you. Yeah, it’s good to be here. Good to be here.

Adam Stott:

Good, we’ve got two gingers today as well.

Neil Jones:

It’s a positive. It’s great.

Adam Stott:

Yeah, that’s right and I see you’ve got your tour you’ve got a tour you mentioned to me before we come on, that your actual tour is what she’s called Ginger is called? Gingerland right. Maybe there’s a spot on that tour for me somewhere. So, good stuff now really excited to have a chat and what I wanted to do is obviously you’ve achieved a lot, you know a lot in your life in a lot of different areas. And that takes a tremendous amount of discipline, and you know obviously work very hard but what I wanted to hear.

First of all, because many people have seen you on TV, no doubt, and certainly fans of your show, but maybe hear about you know the backstory to achieving those 45 championships what it’s been like, you know and how you got into it, and how you actually got into dance in the first place.

Neil Jones

Yeah. It’s kind of a funny one because I actually started through my mom and my sister. So, my sister, I’m an Army boy like moving around, I was born in Germany, moved back to the UK, living on an army base my dad was into me doing like football, Judo stuff like this, but because my sister’s a year older than me, she started doing some dance classes, and my mom would just take me along you know just easy to take me there. So I was there just watching didn’t really want to do it until my sister used to come home with a different trophy, almost every single week. Our winter seal was jam-packed with all of these trophies, and I was like, I think all of us in my family we’re all really competitive.

You know, I think with the football team, you know, if you do a tournament, get a trophy for that, with judo, we’re getting little lines on our belts maybe change the color of the belts, but you know I think I’d only entered one tournament and got gold so I was happy with that but it was like one medal. And then so I was I want to do that dancing stuff, I want some trophies and I kind of got into it through that was doing it like normal after school stuff, and it wasn’t until I think I was around about, I want to say 15, 16 finished school and I was like no, this is what I really want to get into.

I actually moved to Finland for a year, one of my coaches was Norwegian, and he said he’s got a really good friend in Finland and he’d be my coach and I should work with him, so I was like okay so I went across to Finland for the year, my mom I don’t know how she did it. She’s just like go, my mom was always there for just like go do it. So I learned a lot while I was in Finland, came back again to London. And then, when I was 18 I moved to Holland and started dancing with a Dutch girl, and the way the rules work as well within our industry is that you can represent a country as long as one of you is a national.

Adam Stott:

Oh wow.

Neil Jones:

I was English, we could represent Holland, and so I started dancing with her. And our first year we won the title.

Adam Stott:

Nice.

Neil Jones:

Though we were Dutch champions then four years running, kind of came to an end, I think by the end of it. Four years together then I danced with another girl who was actually second place behind me, dance with her. She then became the Dutch champion with me, my former partner then went back to be in second, so it’s kind of I kept my production she dropped and then I was ranked at that time within the top six of the world.

So, everything was going really strong but at that point, my partner was older than me, so I was I got to about the age of 26, and she was, I want to say she was 31, so she was getting to the end of her career she was wanting to have kids and all like this so we stopped dancing together, and then I started dancing with Katya, who’s also on Strictly with me, and we started dancing, and within a year, we were already in the top six of the world again.

We were British champions, and within, I think it was two years we won our first world title. It was all from that and then we title after title and I remember one point we were, I think it was three years running. We hadn’t lost a single competition, every single event we turned up to whatever it was in the world, we won. So, yeah.

Adam Stott:

But the thing is, you know, it almost with that summary sounds easy but I bet it wasn’t right? Okay, so what kind of sacrifice is that to go because nobody really gets to the top of any field do they without working really hard. What was it like for you on that journey I mean you were away from home a lot you traveled a lot? But why do you think you were able to go and succeed at that level, what were the kind of lessons that you learned along the way?

Neil Jones:

I do you know what I think it was that number one, I remember being in a studio in London. There’s a guy there was doing the music and you sat there, and it was all the best dancers in the world, they all came there and I was, I didn’t have a partner at that time so I was just like watching and I turned around to him and I said, One day I’m going to be a world champion, and you know there was someone else sat next to us and they started laughing. I was like, no I’m not joking, and he was the one that turned around and went I believe you know I believe it’s going to happen. And I was like, it will happen. And it’s exactly that, I moved away.

I missed my sister’s wedding, sacrifice, I didn’t go out, like, for me, I actually didn’t touch drinking any alcohol until I was 30, never touched a drop. So everything was for me was just focused on the competition, and how to improve. I’ve worked every single job, you could even think of.

So nowadays when I hear people, I don’t know they want fame or they want something, and they start talking to oh but it’s so hard you know because it’s so expensive and I’m like, well, are you working and they’re like, oh no I’m not working because I wouldn’t be able to do what I’m doing, and I look at them and I said, I had like three jobs while I was training, I learned how to make dresses, to save money too as I made my partner’s dresses I made my clothes I was every single thing you could think of, I was looking and I never thought about it being a business, but I was learning how to cut costs, make as much money as I could, at the same time, just to pay for my dancing.

Adam Stott:

Nice. So really the focus is the key there isn’t there? You know always say focus beats intelligence or skill because the skill can be built, kind of and the intelligence comes with the focus so you know without a shadow of that focus can get people to where they want to go. I love the fact that you verbalized it and you said this is what I want to do this is what I want to become, I think we find that a lot of people that have created a lot of success is they’re not afraid to go and say it and it’s kind of like that decoration is what helps it to come true, isn’t it, you know, and you know keeps you driving well done you know it’s amazing, amazing accomplishments.

And how did you then transit obviously you then you did your work you’ve mastered your craft and you spent all that time focusing and building and folks in a building and you said you didn’t drink a drop till 30 which is really good I think alcohol can be a big distraction for a lot of people. Yeah, what happened where you transition into working in TV and things because that’s massive for you know it’s taking you to you know because a lot of the even the world championships with the dancing, you’ll have fame in that area wouldn’t you like a comfort room but this has actually got you out to the world isn’t it really?

Neil Jones:

Well, it is a massive thing because the good job is I don’t have an ego because of the amount of times as well when you’re doing strictly. And I remember when I first joined, and that was the first year, there was like pros that didn’t get celebs, so they wanted extra pros to be extra dancers, and I’d already worked in the background with strictly from I want to say three years before that.

So we were still competing, and they asked if we could come on and help some of the choreographers, or we could do choreography our self. We were doing that because we were coming to the end of that career. So I already set a goal for myself I said, I want to win this one more World Championship, that was our goal, but at the same time, I knew I wanted to do it in the future.

I said to myself I want to be a choreographer I want to work with music videos I want to do this. So I knew the next stage would be that, so that’s why we slowly started crossing over instead of just going, forget it, that’s gone. We started doing the crossover until we worked with it understood the industry a little bit better understood how it works to be in front and behind the camera, and then we’re ready, you know, then we are ready to transition over to come away from the competitive world still there the events are on if they need us for something if we’re teaching, not a problem, but to then move into this new industry in this new world which as you say, it just brings so much more to it opens up everything.

Adam Stott:

Massive opportunities and also we’re talking about some of those opportunities that you’ve taken you know you’re building upon and we go there in a sec, but we’ll ask you about a bit but stripy fans ask you client questions on that sure that who’s been the best people to kind of work with or the most entertaining or what have you enjoyed about the show.

Neil Jones:

It is exactly what you said, I’ve always been this person that I love football, massive fan, I always have actually George Best used to he used to be our local, that’s where he used to sit and you kind of got bored of him after a while because he was telling himself stories. And the reason he would tell you the story is it’d be like buy me a pint I tell your story. That’s how we work, so I don’t know from it, almost from a young age, I didn’t really care so much about if someone was famous or not. It was what to do with who they were as a person, and having an interesting conversation. And I have to say like being on strictly you’re among so many different people from different areas like I dance with Judy Murray, and me and her, had the best conversations about training about how you’re training different people just mentality, and when you see what she’s been through and what Andy and his brother have been through, you just like, fair play, and also Alex dancing with Alex so strong, you know.

Adam Stott:

Character isn’t you know.

Neil Jones:

Do you know what it is it’s exactly that what we’re just saying they’re confident people?

Adam Stott:

Yeah.

Neil Jones:

And they know what they want, and they’re not sidetracked by any of the little things they’re not sidetracked by fame. They don’t care for any of that, they’re focused on what they want to do in their lives, and they will just keep pushing towards that and that I have a lot of respect for.

Adam Stott:

Now brilliant stuff. Yeah I saw a couple of before we come on I watched a couple of the interviews you had with Alex and they seemed like you know you got really well there as well you know yeah really nice lady. No, good stuff. Okay so what you’ve done is obviously built this great career, you’ve gone into the media, the TV, and you broke onto it. What was it like when you got the first call up to start working and dancing was you know, how did that feel?

Neil Jones:

Yeah, you know, it’s like I said, it was quite a good thing because I knew this was talking about the ego side because I knew that was a step in the door, you know to what I want.

Adam Stott:

From the side of ego though right in a way that actually you want to perform from a dancing perspective, not the fame stuff, but you know what I’m going to be on TV, and I’m a world champion, I want to show what I’m made of that comes in right?

Neil Jones:

Yeah that comes right yeah that comes in and but I had for a lot of my friends who are also top dancers, and the first thing they said to me is like, Why are you going to do that TV show, like you’re a world champion, why would you do that and I was like, if you don’t get it, you don’t get it. There’s no point me even explaining it to you just go away and think about it. And the next thing that started happening because for a few years I didn’t have a celeb partner. I was also getting from my friends. Well, you’re not going to do it next year if you don’t get a celeb are you? You’re not going to, again, are you? You wouldn’t why would you do that to yourself. And I remember one of my friends turning around to me and I can’t remember what he said but he said something down the lines of, he’s like, you’re a world champion, you’re the best at what you do. You’re then going on to a TV show, which they’re not giving you a partner so you’re on the sideline. He like he said, that’s like having Ronaldo on your bench, when you play for Grimsby or something. And I was like now. I was like look, I like the show, I like everyone to do the show the production I said as long as I’m enjoying myself I will be on that show, because it’s a good place to be. And I said, and also it’s good for what I do because it does bring your profile.

Adam Stott:

Yeah of course. Yeah, absolutely. I think that’s a great attitude to have as well, and actually a really good lesson for people listening is like sometimes people could be their patients can really be an enemy, if they’re not patient and they, you know, stop doing something too soon or they let their ego get in the way of what they’re doing and it can absolutely destroy opportunities, like you, you kept it cool, and you know you waited for the right moment and then the opportunities came which is awesome right? So then you’ve used that profile in a really clever way to go and start different businesses aren’t you and I think, you know, when we spoke prior to coming on, you know I’m always a big believer and tell people starting businesses focus on the skills that you’ve got, if you’ve got certain skills or their certain passions, things that you enjoy, you can go and you can monetize them and earn money from them, then it’s a no brainer because you never work a day in your life, you’re just having fun. Yeah, and you said the same thing to me before we come on, in that it was just a natural thing for you to go into. Did you want to talk to us a bit about urban ballroom and tell us a little bit about that?

Neil Jones:

I’ve gone like I’ve been doing it for a while and I’ve gone down different routes with it so the main thing I said because I love creating choreography. So the whole thing was trying to fuse ballroom dancing but make it a little bit more modern, so we could get more people interested in what we were doing and it was all about creating choreography. But during lockdown. A lot of people, everyone was going online, and I used to do these classes at different studios, and then of course everything went on to zoom, it was like great, perfect. So I’m getting people that I might not have ever seen before. They were coming on to the Zoom classes but what I started realizing was the average age I was having on that, I’ve got a mixture. I’ve got some people are in their 60s 70s all the way down to like a 14 year old, like, they’re all coming in same class, but on average it’s more middle age, and then I was kind of understanding that some of the things I was doing in the choreography, were a little bit too much, it was better for higher level competitors. What I started to realize was, I was actually enjoying teaching, like the men, the women, teaching them the knowledge that I had and I could give them so some days we do a piece of choreography to push them of the days, we might just be going through basic things, knowledge, so we started building up this community that also now we’ve put onto Instagram. And, yeah, and they can come on to there. There’s a membership and they just learn everything they want to know about dance.

Adam Stott:

Brilliant. And how the one of the things I will say from a lot of podcast interviews I’ve done. Some of the people who are creating real great success are those that are creating communities, you know, I think that it’s definitely in we’re in a bit of a digital success now what a lot of people looking to do is be a part of something in some way, right. So have you found that the community supporting each other. And for some of the thinking of doing something similar maybe in a different niche in a different area. What would you say the benefits of having a strong community are in business?

Neil Jones:

Well you know as well we’ve gone through all of these different elements where say even a barber Yeah, I remember the time when you just wanted to get in for a haircut and you wanted it to be fast, it’s like you need to be in just cut my hair. Come on, you don’t talk to them you’re like yeah good I’ll see you.

Now you go in there and they’re like, do you want to drink, you know they’re having a conversation with you and you’re trying to relax and have your moment because it’s a wind down it’s, yeah, feeling relaxed, and for me that’s the same thing with the community in any business when you’re learning and you understand more from more people because they’ve experienced it. And as great as it is that you want to go out there and do something on your own and say, I’m the new Elon Musk. Yeah, they all Gary V, or so everybody, even all of those have a team behind them, and those people have always had some type of experience, and all of them are trying to build a community like myself, I’ve got a Tesla, and I love driving it, but the one thing I felt with it is, there is a community within Tesla as well. You come to charge, and there’s always someone you know they’re all there and it’s kind of like they wave to each other, you know when you’re driving by, you know you have that and all of a sudden you go, this is quite nice I feel part of something. I think that’s important in business, it’s for many years and different things that we just feel isolated, we just feel that someone’s taking the money. See you later. Don’t care about the service, and I think service is key. And if you can manage to find a way and at the end of the day is about making money as well, but you can’t just take, you’ve got to give. And the more you learn to give in different ways, I feel that that can really help with monetizing.

Adam Stott:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean look at that, you know, look at that, what you just said about the Tesla right. So you come out of that and you don’t drive a Tesla next time around. That community’s also gone isn’t it you know it’s a fantastic way to actually keep you in the product and actually upgrade the product so say you know what I’m going to go for this one next because you know what, I’m not going to get that same feeling, and I’m not going to get that same community. And I think it definitely increases the lifetime value of a client or somebody wants to stay with you not even necessarily because of the Tesla, but because of the community the brand that goes with it and everything you get from it, you know it’s not necessarily about what product costs it’s not necessarily about what you spend them but how does that product make you feel. Yeah and you know if that product makes you feel great, you’re going to want to keep coming back for more of aren’t you?

Neil Jones:

 Exactly.

Adam Stott:

 I suppose it’s the same with the dances in there, you know, what do people get out of becoming a member when they become a member with you, and they start doing these classes I mean obviously they’re getting the top training from somebody that’s got the proven pedigree, what do they get out of that community do they get a great feeling do they get to help do they do they what they do it for they do it today train to become better dancers or they do it to find some way of exercising I’m just trying to, you know, understand it

Neil Jones:

Is it’s everything you just mentioned there is all of it, because I’ve got so many different people from different like walks of life that are saying, I’ve just started this because I want to get fit again, or someone said, I used to dance.

Adam Stott:

Come on and say like I just want to get my TikTok dances on point.

Neil Jones:

You get it, you know, and then you start understanding because I’m doing a lot with Tiktok now and then I start seeing as well the same thing that actually I’ll teach some of the Tiktok dancers in my classes because then they take that home and they’ve got somewhere to put it.

Adam Stott:

Out there haven’t they, you know.

Neil Jones:

So, it’s everything you know confidence, so if someone goes to a class, they’re in a room with people they don’t know they always stand at the back, they’re a bit worried because they’re like oh that person’s good and they’re good and they get nervous, now they’re in their living room, they can turn their screen off if they want so no one has to watch them. They can learn how to dance.

Adam Stott:

Yeah. It’s actually really, you know, some, as I said, you know this pandemic COVID all of it has created some massive differences and you know as much as it is definitely nice to go to the dance class or meet them get to know people to do that. It’s also really nice to be able to dip your toe in the water. When you’re not super confident and get the skills, and then maybe you feel more confident to go to class right down the line as well.

Neil Jones:

Yeah 100%.

Adam Stott:

And we find that a lot with what we do we do webinars right now where we also always used to live events, but now we’ll do an online training, and, you know, you meet so many people through the online training now that probably wouldn’t have come out to a day event but they will come online, you know, invest an hour and a half couple of hours. I think it’s a big thing for business and I think every single business, you know, if you listen to this right now you’ve  got to be looking at how do you put a proportion of your business online because at the end of the day, the internet’s open 24 hours a day. All right.  And if you want to make more money you need to have your shop open 24 hours a day, didn’t you? As well, you know that opportunity so without doubt very, very important. That’s just really cool stuff. So what’s next for you then Neil got a couple other questions that I want to ask as well but what are where do you see things going next.

Neil Jones:

Well, the thing is with any company it’s, it’s trying to build it up, like I’m always talking to everybody, they’re like, you know, what are they missing what do they want to see more, what can we do more. So, always that side I’m always playing around and trying to I don’t know a certain email might come in with questions and I’m going great, I didn’t think about that. Let me do that let me get that side and trying to build it up, and then there’s always other little projects like everyone knows I’m in my heart I’m creative, that’s the amount of times my friends have said to me that you need to be there and people should just pay you for ideas for whatever, they come into my head and I don’t have enough hours in the day to get them out so for me, one of the major things I’ve had to find is focus is you know the same focus

Adam Stott:

Do that in the dancing, you see how powerful that can be and, you know, if that comes into business, you’ll be unstoppable.

Neil Jones:

And you unstoppable.

Adam Stott:

Yeah, I think so it’s interesting that you’ve sort of transitioned to the business quite quickly there is there things that you’ve studied, have you had mentors, have you had people that give you guidance, do you read books, and he’s just really good for other people to hear if there’s some practices that you put in place to try and push yourself in that area,

Neil Jones:

You know, a lot of things I’ve taken like I said, from what I was doing in the dancing and the type of training, one of the major ones is the mental side as a dancer, you know, we go for everything. We’re learning how to dance, but we’re also going into physio, because, and not just prevent like, you know recovery but also prevention, but then also we’ve got the sides of the mental side, and a lot of people don’t think about that, that you need to talk to people who have nothing to do with what you’re doing, sometimes just to hear your own thoughts.

Adam Stott:

Yeah, definitely. Yeah,

Neil Jones:

And this is an important side and that’s a great investment. A lot of reading a lot of stuff I look at online as well, I get some books but even like, I’m big on social media, how it works. And the problem you’ve got with books, they’re outdated as soon as they come out, you know, they’re already behind, so I found that doesn’t work for social media but just looking online and also people you follow, I tend to follow a lot of business stuff online just to hear, and there’s a few things there as well like that were discussing with my friend before at school you do all these subjects at school to learn, and I didn’t go to college or university or anything. You know, it’s, it’s like you know it’s life, but I wish at school. We actually talked about not saving, but investing.

Adam Stott:

Yeah, definitely. There so many topics at school that they the atonia, you know they want to teach you algebra but they don’t want to teach your business you know it’s just when it’s crazy isn’t it? I think school is very much geared to academic people take an exam, They see how many you got right, how many did you remember, it’s not necessarily geared towards creative people, you know creative people operate in a different way, don’t they, and, and I think creativity is a massive thing in business, being able to create something out of nothing and make it happen, is what business is all about. And that’s why a lot of people that really academic struggle in business but more creative, they’re not afraid to fail as well so if you’re a creative person, you’re going to go in and go, Well, you know, if it doesn’t work, it doesn’t work, and you need that mentality to go well, I do everything I can to make it work and I’m just going to go for it, and you put that stuff in place you’re going to get better results aren’t you ? You know.

Neil Jones:

Yeah definitely it’s 100% like that you and it’s all trial and error, it’s like testing things out, test the waters, see how it works.

Adam Stott:

Absolutely.

Neil Jones:

If people like it they don’t like it, and I used to, there was a period I lived in Hong Kong, through the dances and one thing I noticed with Hong Kong is, I would be there every month. And I could go away, Come back three weeks later, and one shop had disappeared and a new shop was put in the same class, realize that they’re really quick, that they when a business doesn’t work, they go gone. Next, they don’t waste time they don’t hang on to it, it doesn’t. In a way, you got to be passionate about it, but they don’t become emotional about it.

Adam Stott:

Yeah, well that’s a really key point because in business, you know, emotions, your business doesn’t get emotional about you, does it, and I find that people get emotional by their business we don’t get the emotion back from the business or the emotions aside, I’m definitely worked from logic, without a doubt. Why don’t we just before we finish our talk about your tour you know I said that it’s been put back, tell them what’s actually happening on the tour. What are you what is the show about what’s it like. And when’s it coming.

Neil Jones:

I’m really into creating, and I’ve created tours like I’ve directed and did the choreography for other people’s tours, and I’ve done one myself which I put in Sadler’s world and basically we were the first ever Latin show to be able to perform that saddle as well so that was one of the things that business wise it wasn’t a great move, because we lost a lot of money. Still, it’s something I know for the future. It was an investment to be known as the first creator to put a Latin show in saddle as well, you’ll never get that back. So that’s done, then I sat down with a producer because I produced my own show, and I just said that, I want to work with you I want to co-produce this show, and he was like alright well tell me about it and I said, I’m still creating it I just tell you the name, and he was like what’s the name of ginger land and he went, yes I’m in. I’m in. I’m done. And yeah so ginger land and now, I wrote the whole thing. It is exactly what it says it’s a made up world where all gingers come from. And Gingerbread, there’s, you know there’s gingerbread people, there’s the fairy ginger mother there’s everything. It’s a kind of feeling like Panto means musical we’ve got we’ve got our own created our own music for it, and it talks about where do you just come from facts about gingers the myths about gingers you know, singing dance and comedy it’s every bit, if you’re ginger.

Adam Stott:

That’s pretty cool you know, sounds really, really good. And that’s coming out in February March next year.

Neil Jones:

Yeah. Yeah.

Adam Stott:

Awesome stuff. So just to finish off then Neil from your entire career winning World Championships going through the process of like literally getting onto TV and building a personal brand starting businesses all the things you’ve done, what kinds of things, three tips would you give or say three lessons along your way. And you might have alluded to a couple of them already, But you know what were the three things you would three bits of advice you’d give a business owner, or somebody starting a business, to make sure that they could go and grow.

Neil Jones:

Definitely love the process.

Adam Stott:

Nice.

Neil Jones:

Love the process, whether it’s good or bad, that’s what you’ve got to fall in love with. I fell in love with when I was competing, not the winning. I fell in love with actually trying to get to the top. So, the business line you’re doing fall in love with that side the creation of your product, they’re getting out there trying to sell it, you know, things like that fall in love with that moment, rather than just the money.

Adam Stott:

Pretty good.

Neil Jones:

Never quit. No matter where you feel you are with that, choose a different line that doesn’t matter but just never quit. You’re never too old. One of my students in Hong Kong, and her mom still goes into the office, they’re the owner of the company still going to the office which is 102. If it’s in your blood, it’s in your blood, keep. No matter what, and find things that you love to take your mind away from it every now and again as well.

Adam Stott:

So I actually have some other hobbies that you can enjoy.

Neil Jones:

Because you might find that those hobbies, become your new business.

Adam Stott:

Nice. So some great advice there from Neil, Neil you’ve been amazing guests been super fun, loads of value therefore if you’ve been listening tonight. Make sure you remember to go and give us a five star review on iTunes, Spotify, wherever you’re listening so and keep tuning in for the best guests, the most up to date business content is my amazing tips. Neil, you’ve been a fabulous guest. Good luck with your tour. Good luck with the business, urban ballroom as well go and follow Neil on Instagram and if you’re not already following me, make sure you follow me too. What’s your Instagram handle buddy, Mr_NJonesofficial. Okay. Mr_NJonesofficial gotten dropped him a follow, so you can learn more about all the stuff he’s coming up. Thanks very much for listening everybody, and thank you again Neil for being a fabulous guest.

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