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Episode 227: The Focus and Passion for Skating with Alex Murphy


Building a business is like playing your favorite sport. It requires a lot of focus, passion, discipline, and challenges to overcome. Alex has always loved skating, and with her previous experiences with stroke and heart surgery, she has become more appreciative of her life and more passionate about what she does. In this episode, Adam Stott and Alex Murphy discuss how an athlete’s challenges, mindset, and attitude can apply to business.

Alex Murphy is a professional skater who won Dancing on Ice two consecutive times, went to Disney on Ice, joined the Royal Caribbean cruise, appeared on different TV shows, and took part in the Dutch version of Dancing on Ice. At the age of 24, she suffered from a stroke and went into heart surgery. Now, Alex is building her brand on social media and broadcasting her message through her podcasts.

Show Highlights:

  • Alex Murphy’s journey to becoming a skater
  • How her self-discipline and focus enabled her to become a professional skater
  • Her life-changing experience with stroke and heart surgery
  • The athlete’s attitude toward challenges; and
  • How to build a brand on social media and broadcast a message through podcasting

Links Mentioned:

Connect with Alex Murphy on Instagram @almurph18 and listen to her podcast Murphy’s Law with Alex Murphy

Join the Ultimate Three Day Business Event and learn more Business Growth Secrets

Be part of our Facebook Group Big Business Events Members Network

Connect with me on Instagram @adamstottcoach

Transcript:

Please note this is a verbatim transcription from the original audio and therefore may include some minor grammatical errors.

Adam Stott:

So, hello, everybody, and welcome to today’s episode of Business Growth Secrets. I’m really, really excited to have an amazing guest on somebody that’s done some really cool things and had a great career. And that is Alex Murphy; is a two times champion for Dancing on Ice, and also had some amazing career and lots of different things happening. I’m really looking forward to unearthing Alex’s story in a bit more detail.

Of course, for me when we do this podcast, one of the things that’s really important in business is to make sure you have a good level of discipline that you apply yourself to, that you focus on and that you stay on track. And I think that Alex is going to be a great example of all of that. So welcome, Alex, great to have you on and super excited to be chatting to you today. How are you? So, it’s just to start off with things good. 

Alex Murphy:

Hi, thanks for having me on. How are you doing?

Adam Stott:

So yeah, you know, really excited to hear a little bit more about your story and a bit about the things that you’ve been through and understanding, you know, how it is that you’ve managed to turn yourself into a two time champion for dancing, and much more. So do you want to tell us a little bit about you, Alex, and say a bit about your background? How did you get into, you know, skating originally? And what’s it been like for you on that journey?

Alex Murphy:

Sure. I’m actually from a skating household. My mom is a skating coach. So, I started in diapers pretty much. It was a little bit like babysitting. It was just a little bit of daycare where I was coming to work with her. Then I think I showed a little bit of promise and they decided to put me into actual lessons. So I competed until I was 18 and then I turned professional and actually technically like 17. I went on to Disney on Ice and Royal Caribbean cruise ships and Dancing On Ice. And yeah, some really cool other TV shows show Mexico and I just became a professional skater.

Adam Stott:

And also a bit like so in terms of actually being a professor. I didn’t know about Disney on Ice. That’s pretty cool. Right? Always wanted to go on one that sounded good. The cruise I mean… 

Alex Murphy:

Yeah, I went on a cruise. Cruise ships. 

Adam Stott:

Awesome. Awesome. So in terms of you building up and getting into that level, you obviously had to do a lot of training, you know, and it’s a tough sport, isn’t it? From what I’ve seen, it’s not something that’s, you know, something that’s good takes it out of you, right?

Alex Murphy:

It is one of those sports where they want you to make it look easy, but it’s not.

Adam Stott:

Absolutely, absolutely. So, what’s it been like for you being a professional skater? Since you’ve been a teen? What’s that journey been? Like? You know, has it been tough? Has it been a struggle? Was it something that you did? Did you just love it when you first started? Or was it something you grew to love that kind of happened?

Alex Murphy:

It’s one of those sports that if you’re lucky to be able to go professional, you know, there’s only like, I was reading the stat the other day, there’s only like 1% of people say that they can say that they’re professional athletes. So, I feel really fortunate to have even been able to go professional with it, because it is so hard to get in and to be competitive. And so I was really, really fortunate to get a spot on Disney on Ice as you know, as an 18 year olds.

Then I spent, you know, three years with them. And I loved it, it was really challenging. Because at the end of the day, it’s almost like some skating shows or like auditioning for a movie. So, if you don’t fit the part you don’t get the part doesn’t matter how good you are. It could be just what you look like, it could be your size, things like that. 

So, it was really tough in the beginning, because you have to kind of wrap your head around the fact that it’s not about your technical skills. So on competition days, you know, okay, well I compete. If I fall on that job, I know I’m not going to do as well as someone who lands it. But you go to the show worlds in the professional world. And that kind of is thrown out the window. It could be oh, well you look more like this Disney princess or you fit the bill for this card better. So it was a bit challenging in the beginning. But then I think once I figured out the industry, and I figured out you know how I felt about it. I didn’t take it as personal if that makes sense.

Adam Stott:

Absolutely. Yeah, absolutely. So, what part did you play? I’m curious.

Alex Murphy:

Now, I was so funny. I was Jessie from Toy Story on one show. And then I was Martha in High School Musical for almost two and a half years.

Adam Stott:

Oh, really my son is like the biggest Toy Story fan you’ve ever met. I’m not kidding you. Yeah, I absolutely love that.

Alex Murphy:

Read. I loved it. I absolutely love the show.

Adam Stott:

Brilliant. So, how did that transfer to you breaking onto getting the Dancing On Ice space on TV. 

Alex Murphy:

So from there I went, I gained a lot of experience from Disney on Ice, then I went to cruise ships, Royal Caribbean cruise ships. And I spent almost five years there traveling and on their shows. And that’s an extremely competitive world for the figure skating world because there’s less number of skaters, so it’s really hard to get on. So I was super fortunate to get a spot there.

Then it was really funny. They were, you know, a friend of mine said, Oh, they’re auditioning for the Dutch version of Dancing On Ice. And at this point, like Dancing On Ice had finished in the UK, and I never even had heard of it before. And I was like, what’s that? So we watched an episode of the UK version last fall, that was fun. And I knew that they were auditioning for the sixth season of the Dutch version of it.

So, I just sent in a video and I somehow got the spot. got really, really lucky. I got this spot. And I went out to Amsterdam and skated for them. But at this point, the UK one obviously was done. And then when they did the revamp, when they decided to do the revamp, I actually got a message on Facebook, to be honest, asking me to send an audition tape. 

Adam Stott:

Oh, awesome. What was the difference between the Dutch one and the UK one, then how was it different for you in terms of, you know, the overall kind of show and maybe the profile is as high profile in Holland as it is in the UK? Would you say?

Alex Murphy:

You know, it actually really was that a lot of people didn’t realize how big of a deal Holland wasn’t Holland, but like when I was on it, it was on its sixth season, and it did so well. And one thing I would say is different as British tabloids are very different. So you find a lot more press following you around over here in the UK. Whereas in Amsterdam, it was like we went about our day when we went to work. We stayed in the hotel at night, you know, it was very normal. And then you know, as the season went on, and progressive, you know, as we did well, people started to recognize us a bit more. But now over in the UK, it’s really funny because there’s just a lot of media over here.

Adam Stott:

Absolutely. Absolutely. And in the UK you with Joe Swash right. Is that right? 

Alex Murphy:

I had Joe, my last season. Yeah.

Adam Stott:

And what was he like? Was he good? 

Alex Murphy:

He’s a dream. Honestly, when I got Joe, he was in last place and he was really struggling. And he just worked his butt off to get to where he got to. And he’s an amazing person. He’s a really, really good, great guy.

Adam Stott:

It’s a difficult thing for someone to pick up, isn’t it? And you know, start to actually go and do the training really intensively?

Alex Murphy:

It’s been a long time. And the thing is, it’s like you don’t realize how long the hours are until you can’t feel your feet. It’s long hours in the cold, which makes it so much harder.

Adam Stott:

Absolutely. And of course you famously, then I think was the age of 24. Is that right? You had, you know, quite a big, big setback. What was that like for you? Especially someone who has been an athlete for many, many years. And, you know, how did that affect you? And what was that? Like? Really for you too, I explain what it was for the audience as well. So, we get a bit of an understanding.

Alex Murphy:

Yeah, so when I was 24, I actually had a stroke, I had a stroke that was caused by a hole in my heart. And I was on cruise ships, and I was skating in a show. And I just finished. I still have my skates on. And I was changing out of my costume and backstage and I had a stroke in front of, you know, all my colleagues. And fortunately for me, I was on a cruise ship.

So, they rushed me down to the hospital ward. And they, you know, addressed me there, they didn’t know what it was because I was 24. And they couldn’t understand that like a 24 year old will be having a stroke. So they gave me a shot of Valium to, you know, calm me down and to see what would happen and I fell asleep. But I wasn’t able to read or write for eight hours, I couldn’t really stand, I was a bit of a mess. But then fortunately, they gave me another shot of value. That broke up the blood clot to my brain and which is just a stroke of luck, you know, at the end of the day. And then I just happened to have been. It was almost like the perfect storm. 

We happen to be doing the crossing to go back to Florida from the Mediterranean. And I was just getting on to like day one of an eight day crossing where we are in the middle of the ocean where, you know, no one can get to you. And we just stopped in Tenerife in the Canary Islands.

So, they landed me in Tenerife. And then the ship went on without me and I stayed in the Canary Islands for nine days where they did all these tests. And then they flew me to Miami and they found out that I had a hole in my heart and that was, you know, that was the cause of the stroke. So I had heart surgery. So it was tough. It was a big setback, but also totally a life changing experience. But in a weird way I would say it’s like the best thing that ever happened to me. Because it made me really grateful and I was able to get back on the ice later. You know, get myself back into shape. And I actually went to the Dutch version of the show a month later.

Adam Stott:

Did you really? Wow. 

Alex Murphy:

Yeah, really fortunate.

Adam Stott:

I think, you know, the mindset of that, you know, to beat yourself back up and is incredible, really what was going on in your mind? How did you kind of keep yourself motivated and positive? Was it your love for what you were doing? Or, you know, just didn’t want to kind of, you know, have an impact. A lot of people might acquit might and they, so…

Alex Murphy:

Yeah, to be fair, they said to me, you know, we can put you on blood thinners for the rest of your life, but you can’t skate. Or we can give you heart surgery and hope that this works. And you know, you’ll be fine, you can skate again. I was just like, back skating. And I think it was just like, that fear of failure that you just, you don’t want to give up. I think that’s an athlete’s brain, too. I looked at my surgery, I looked at my stroke as almost like an athletic challenge. It was almost like getting through your skating routine, it was like getting through your training every day since I had since I was little. 

So, I didn’t look at it. As you know, everything was progressive, where I think a lot of stroke survivors struggle, because they don’t have that goal in mind. They don’t understand that, you know, as an athlete, you work really hard to achieve one thing. And then once you’ve achieved that you try to achieve the next thing. And I think that that is what helped me get over my stroke, if that makes sense.

Adam Stott:

Yeah, absolutely. Having that kind of, and I think that’s, you know, for anybody that’s listening, that’s in business, we have a lot of people in business, listen to the podcast, that focus is, I think, a really, really important thing, one of the things that we train is, is to get people really to focus and understand where they’re moving towards, because it gives them purpose, right, and gets them through the bad. Asked me like, you just had that brilliant focus that allowed you to keep pushing forward, and it’s gonna sort of go make it happen, right?

Alex Murphy:

Yeah, I think that’s just sometimes like an athlete’s mentality, fortunately, they’re able to focus on the next thing, and they’re able to, you know, see the bigger picture, if that makes sense. I think I saw the bigger picture. And I was like, okay, well, I know, I need to get back skating. So, let’s just get this heart surgery over. Let’s just get these tests over. So, I took everything day by day. And then once you know, the heart surgery, I was like, okay, well, I took my recovery very seriously. You know, things like that. I think that was what allowed me to get back so quickly.

Adam Stott:

Absolutely. Absolutely. And then to go on, and, you know, hit the heights for your career after that.

Alex Murphy:

Yeah, actually, really lucky. They’re like, the best moments after all.

Adam Stott:

Yeah, that’s really good and amazing. No, that’s cool. So, what did you kind of learn from all of that? You know, what? You said you learn gratitude? Really? 

Alex Murphy:

Yeah, I think I was very, I learned to be really grateful for what I had. Because I know that there’s so many stroke survivors that they don’t get to walk again. They don’t get to speak again. So I had a lot of this weird thing. I would say like, it’s like a bit of survivor’s guilt for a while, where I felt really guilty that I was fine, that my life had just carried on.

And then I went, I did go through a period of time where like, I realized, like, oh, I’m supposed to, I was on a high after it. I was like, okay, great. I have my stroke. Three months later, I won the Dutch Dancing On Ice, then I went back to cruise ships, and I was normal. And then I just didn’t, I never felt like myself, probably for about three years after that, because I was supposed to be, I was great. I was back on a high and everything’s supposed to be good. 

And you’re just supposed to go back to being normal. But it’s a traumatic experience that happens to you. And you just have to kind of, you have to deal with it. A lot of people deal with it. Later on in life. I dealt with mine, probably like, five years later, I would say like it was, it wasn’t until a few years later that I was like, Oh, wow, that was a really awful experience. And that was really hard for me. And I didn’t, I wasn’t feeling it at the time. But I did. You know, you’re just supposed to feel normal. A lot of times people have surgeries, or they have, you know, life changing homes, and they think, oh, you’re just supposed to feel normal right after you’re not ever gonna feel normal right after.

Adam Stott:

Sort of really interesting and, you know, especially you say that you dealt with it, and dealt with it in the right way. For sure. And you know, what you said there in terms of going on and winning. You were obviously one of the Dutch one. Why is it you won? Do you think? What is it that you the best skater were you the most focused on? What do you think would suit you to be in? Because you’ve obviously won twice, haven’t you?

Alex Murphy:

So yeah, I’ve been really lucky.

Adam Stott:

A bit more than luck to it.

Alex Murphy:

I think that I’ve got a really different feeling for the sport than most professionals, if that makes sense. Because I did have my stroke on the ice because I did everything surrounded by skating. I have a different love for it. I think they’re the most like professional performers and they’re amazing. And on the show. I’ve been so lucky to skate with great performers, but I love it so much more than them. If that makes sense. Like my love for it is a different level of love because I know, I know that it can be taken away. I’ve been there where it was taken away and I know that I love It’s so much more because it kind of saved my life in a weird way.

Adam Stott:

Absolutely. You know, so you think love is the love of war that really? So, what does that love do? Because I think that’s getting…

Alex Murphy:

I think that, yeah, I think that the love of the sport or the love of the joy of being, yeah makes you work harder, makes your drives a bit more than ever you have something to prove more than everybody else does. That makes sense.

Adam Stott:

Yeah, it does make sense. So I think it’s really interesting. One of the other things that we tell business owners is that it’s much easier to do something that your pet does not do, but it’s much better if you’re passionate about it. Because if you’re passionate about it, when the challenges come up, you’re not going to kind of, you know, your desire is going to be there to overcome the challenges rather than sort of allow those challenges to kind of get in your way right? And so, much easier.

If you love what you do to just keep on going doesn’t mean it’s easy to keep going. Right. So, it’s really interesting that you say that. That’s why I wanted to get the depths of it. Because you say, Well, I love it was great that you love it. You know, I love football, but I’m not any good. I’m not bad. I’m certainly not professional, you know? So, yeah. So, do you feel that that just gave you that extra drive to keep pushing on?

Alex Murphy:

Yeah, it does. It changes your passion, too. I think when you realize that something can be taken from you, all of a sudden, you want it more, I think you crave it again. And I think I love skating. But I was kind of at that point, I think I had been FreshMail for like eight years, seven or eight years. And I think I was like, you know, maybe lackluster with it where I was like, oh, it’s great. You know, I had been to the pyramids in Egypt. And I’ve done all these amazing traveling things I was starting, it was losing its shine. 

And then the minute, you know, I had my stroke, and I realized, oh my god, this is over. This could be over, then all of a sudden that sparkle came back. And I think you can sparkle if some people have a sparkle. I would say that like some people have it. And I think that my skating got better after my stroke because I just loved it more. I was skating. Maybe not skating technically my best right after it. But I had a different feel and a different love and a different look on the ice, I think because every day I was grateful to be there every day, right?

Adam Stott:

Yeah, I think that’s amazing, really. And I think it’s really interesting that, you know, it had that kind of impact on you. And I think it’s interesting for people to maybe as a lesson for their businesses to understand that as well. So you’ve won it twice. I mean, I’ve seen that you’ve got your podcast as well.

Alex Murphy:

Yeah, we’ve got a podcast out, I’m really lucky. So my whole life I always wanted to be. I love skating, but I kind of in a weird way fell into professional skating. I auditioned, and I never thought I’d be good enough to get it. And you know, it was so highly competitive in my area as well that we were like, now you won’t get it. It’s no big deal. But it’s a good experience to audition. And I did get it.

Once you’re in the, you know, professional industry things, it’s easier to get more jobs. But I always wanted to be a TV reporter, I wanted to do TV and entertainment. So, I always thought that I would be doing broadcasting, I was gonna study broadcast journalism. And I postponed it. And so now it’s really funny. I feel like I’ve achieved all the skating things I’ve wanted to achieve, you know, I don’t have anything else that I was on my bucket list of professional careers, you know, to win it once was enough for me. And then to win it twice was just, like, outrageous.

So I was just so happy with it. Now I think it’s kind of taking on a different career where I’ve done some, you know, I’m doing podcasts, and I host a show called [00:18:41-00:18:43] skating where we put celebrities on the ice and I interview them. And I’m just kind of going down the entertainment side now, which is something that I’ve always wanted to do since I was a kid but never had the opportunity to and now this platform from the skating has given me the ability to do.

Adam Stott:

Brilliant. And further talk about the podcast a little bit about obviously, we’re on a podcast now. But I think people are listening and you know, a lot of people listening, a lot of the people that listen to this are interested in marketing and understanding how to get their message out there. Yeah, certainly what you’re doing and I’ve seen you Instagram, you’re doing really well.

Alex Murphy:

And social media is huge, isn’t it a whole thing. Like, it’s a whole world in itself. I’m now at my full time job in social media where, you know, I used to shut down when COVID happened and every ice rink was closed for 11 months. And, you know, I would have coached or done anything but because of that it pushed me forward into the social media world. I had to work really hard to figure out how I was going to build a brand. And it means you’re saying this is a business podcast and obviously like you guys must be interested in branding and it is really, really hard like it is right? 

Adam Stott:

It’s because I feel that Americans are much better off building a brand, right? It’s a seminar we teach over, right and something that we help our clients with. And some of our clients have become so successful in understanding how to build their brand, because it is quite unusual in the US. But in America, you know, always notice, because I’ve spent a lot of time in America and I’ve done a lot of training over there. I’ve been over trained in business over there.

One of the things I always noticed was when I used to go over, there was just simple stuff like the realtors having their face on giant billboards out there, and no one in the UK would ever do that. That just doesn’t happen. Right? Yeah. You know, never ever happens in the UK. It’s not here. It’s just people don’t position themselves, there’s a bit of a polite thing about you is that you don’t kind of put yourself out there as much, right? 

Alex Murphy:

Because you don’t want to feel narcissistic, I think that a lot of people feel that by pushing yourself and by and I mean, I felt this way with social media, if I’m honest, my first two years of the dance guys over here, I hardly used it, and I should have used it. I should have grown my brand. And, and I was just like, I don’t want to be narcissistic, I don’t want people to think that I’m, you know, pushing myself too hard.

Adam Stott:

A lot of people, Alex, you know, certainly a lot of the listeners of this podcast would probably have had those thoughts, right? Yeah, absolutely. So, how did you overcome that? I think it’s really, really interesting. I see you’re doing a great job on Instagram, and I see you doing your podcast and getting your message out there. And you’re following your dream of broadcasting. So, why don’t you tell us a little bit about what that journey has been like for you as well.

Alex Murphy:

I think it was just about authenticity. You know, when I finished Dancing on Ice, and I knew I wasn’t gonna go back to next year, I was like, what am I going to do now? My biggest thing was, well, I want to do this social media, I want to do this branding, I want to, you know, get my message out. And I want to be working, I want to be a working presenter. And so it was like, Well, how do you make that happen for yourself.

I think, for me, it was about like, letting my guards down and say, in actually showing myself, you know, my boyfriend, he said to me, one day he goes, it’s a shame that you don’t use your social media for what you’re actually like, you’re actually really funny and really personable. And a lot of it is just like pretty pictures of you and I skated dresses. And he was right. I was like, actually, nobody really knows my personality. So, I think I use the authenticity of you’ve got this free platform, the social media platform where you can say anything you want to say and be anything you want to be. And I wasn’t using it to who I actually was. 

So once I started using it, people were buying into it, people were like, oh, she is funny, oh, she is an athlete. But she has something to say, you know, and then the more things that come off the back of that, the more you know, the snowball rolls, and eventually you get momentum. And then I can talk about the hard things. You know, my podcast, Murphy’s Law is, it’s interviews with celebrities, but it’s all about, like, the bad moments in their life. It’s all about the Murphy’s Law moments when everything just went wrong, and everything was miserable, and how they like to drag themselves back up instead of a happy interview of, you know, oh, I did this. So, it’s almost backwards because I wanted to talk to people about crap moments, because I’ve had so many bad moments. And I was like, that’s..

Adam Stott:

A differentiating point, Alex, you know, because there’s not that many like that. Right. So certainly a different issue. What was the idea behind that? You know, was that part of the brand strategy was that just…

Alex Murphy:

To be honest, I was sitting with my manager one day, and she was like, you know, I think that we can get you a podcast we just need to know, what would you talk about? What do you want to say? And I was like, well, obviously, like, I’ve got things that I’m passionate about. I’m passionate about ice skating. I’m passionate about, you know, being a good daughter, being a good, you know, partner to my boyfriend, a good dog mom, like being a good person. And I’m obviously passionate about strokes.

I was like, you know, those of my three pillars of things, but also, I am so into humor, like I got by with everything, some humor and some laughing. And I said, and I was like, and my life is just like Murphy’s Law. And we were just sitting there and it was like this light bulb moment. I was like, everything always goes wrong in my life. But then everything in a weird way I live backwards. I live in a way that everything that can go wrong will go wrong. That’s that age old saying of Murphy’s law. But everything that goes wrong in my life always leads me to something that I never imagined. That is better, if that makes sense. Like I never imagined going on Dancing On Ice and winning. 

I never imagined going on Dancing On Ice and playing twice you know, I never imagined any of these things. But I also never thought I’d have to hit this really love, you know, almost dying first. So it’s always extreme, but Alex Murphy’s life is very extreme. So I was like, this could be it. And then I was like Murphy’s Law. Oh my god, it’s Murphy’s Law. And I think that’s it but let’s get the message out and tell these awful stories about you know, the media sold you out and this happened or you know, you had this accident or you’ve done this that people don’t know about But like, people see you on the outside as being perfect.

Like, I want to know the crap, I want to know the bad stuff I want to sit down with you and, and I was like, let’s make this really authentic let’s like if these were my friends which 90% of the of the cast on the first season that I brought in, I’ve known personally for a while. I sat down with them, I could say to them, like, let’s have a beer, sit down and have a conversation, because that would be a conversation that I would have in my house over a drink, like very casual. And I think that’s what I wanted.

So when the idea came out, and when obviously, the podcast team was like, Oh my God, we love it. I was like, my number one thing, and all of this is to be authentic. To Alex Murphy. If I slip up and I say a swear word, whatever, we have to bleep it out. You know, I wanted it to be authentic. I think that that will be the best brand strategy to tell anyone if you have got to be authentic to yourself to what you are because people don’t want to see perfection anymore.

Adam Stott:

That’s it. That’s how I totally agree. I think everything you say is nailed on. And you know, it’s without a shadow of a doubt. If you just be yourself. And the thing is the right people are fine. You want people to walk loafing, that’s okay. You don’t want them anyway.

Alex Murphy:

Exactly. You’ve got to realize that like the people that you will draw to you, they’re going to align with your life and your goals. And then all of a sudden, you’re gonna realize you don’t see anyone else outside of that. Does that make sense? There’s no one else outside. You’ll just find yourself with like minded people.

Adam Stott:

Yeah, absolutely. I think there is some fantastic advice there. You know, it’s now in terms of building the brand and getting your message out there. And it’s also, you know, transitioning the careers and lots of great advice there. So, you know, some brilliant stuff there, Alex, in terms of people getting in touch with you, before we forfeit, before we finish up? Why don’t we just ask you for, say, three tips? What three tips would you give for, you know, somebody that maybe that’s going through a tough time, that they can have a tough time or a difficult time or they’ve had a few setbacks? What are the three things that you would say to them, from your experience, maybe that they should look at doing in order to kind of inspire them to keep pushing forward and moving forward? I think that’d be nice.

Alex Murphy:

I guess I would say that things always come in waves. So, for every app that you’re going to have, you’re going to have a down, you cannot expect to live lovely, like I’ve always had this forever, I do not live level, it’s always, I’m either really high or really low, it’s very rare to be in a position where things are just like, settled. I think for every area in a really big low now, there will be a big pie eventually, that’s just the way that you know, the world works.

I’d say learn to ride the waves, like really learn to ride the waves and just know that things will get better. And then I guess it’s like, just being your authentic self is going to get you out of so much stuff, like learning to accept the way that you are the person that you are, what you want to do, whether it’s in business and career, you know, in your life, or, you know, relationships, you have to stay authentic to yourself. 

And I think that I didn’t realize any of this stuff until I was 24. Until I did have a stroke. And now I mean, I’m 33. Now, I’m going to be hitting my 10 year off of my stroke-aversary I call it but I feel like I was born when I had that. I feel like my stroke aversary feels more important to me than a birthday. You’re being yourself, right? Yeah. Yeah, it made me go Oh, my God, well, I don’t align with these things. I don’t like this, I don’t like this. But I do love this is super important to me. You know, what, what do I find important in life?

Well, these are the things and I think that is really, really important. And I also just think, you know, you can’t always want to wake up every day and do everything. You’re not always going to be motivated, but you kind of just have to do it. You have to fake it till you make it. I think that’s like the three things I live by just sometimes when I feel like crap, I still do it anyways.

Adam Stott:

Which is such, you know, an amazing skill that if people could only just get that. Yeah, they would get so much more just to do anyway. Right? Because everybody has those moments that they don’t feel like getting stuff done and to do it. Perfect. Love it. Absolutely love it. So, thanks so much. I leak something. It’s been an amazing chat. Where is the best place for people to want to just tell people where they can sort of get in touch with you and you know really suggest to go and follow. Alex’s journey may be tuned into our podcasts. Murphy’s Law. Yeah, what’s your Instagram handle darling so people can know.

Alex Murphy:

My handles on everything, on Instagram, on Facebook, on tik tok, on whatever you can find me it’s Almur18. I literally had that screen name since I was a little girl and I never thought anything would come from it and then all of a sudden that’s my platform name. So no one but that’s been my, that’s where you guys can find me on anything. And the podcast is called Murphy’s Law with Alex Murphy. So if you want to search…

Adam Stott:

Because I think it sounds very, very interesting in the story that you yourself, you know what you’re saying they’re different angles. Sounds great. So go and check that out as well.

Alex Murphy:

Yeah, I don’t want to know the good things. I want to know the bad thing. So I know that that’s hard for people to talk about. But I feel like that’s the stuff that’s the juicy stuff that I want to know.

Adam Stott:

So, well, thanks so much, Alex.

Alex Murphy:

You’re welcome.

Adam Stott:

Hi, everybody, Adam here. And I hope you love today’s episode. I hope you thought it was fabulous. And if you did, I’d like to ask you a small favor. Could you jump over and go and give the podcast a review. Of course, I’ll be super grateful. That is a five star review with putting our all into this podcast for you, delivering you the content, giving you the secrets. And if you’ve enjoyed it, please go and give us a review and talk about what your favorite episode is perhaps every single month.

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