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Episode 236: From Marks & Spencer to Successful Entrepreneur with Jenifer Rosenberg OBE


To be awarded an OBE (Order of the British Empire) by the queen herself for doing something you love is a dream come true. This is what happens to Jenifer Rosenberg when she received an OBE in 1989 for services to the fashion industry. 

In this episode, Adam Stott speaks with Jenifer Rosenberg OBE about her career journey from Marks & Spencer’s post room to owning a ladieswear manufacturing business, becoming a successful businesswoman, and building charity to make her husband’s dream become a reality.

Jennifer Rosenberg OBE is the Chair Founder and Managing Director of J&J Fashions, Britain’s largest privately-owned ladieswear manufacturer supplying Marks and Spencer, employing 3,000 people with 12 factories throughout the UK. She is also Chair and Trustee of the Heart Cells Foundation, which was founded in 2004 and raised £6 million to fund three gold trials and open a stem cell center at Barts Hospital to enable patients across the UK with heart disease to receive treatment.

Show Highlights:

  • Discover the best ways to develop children’s confidence
  • How Jenifer’s career skyrocketed in the fashion industry
  • What are the benefits of having a team in building a business
  • Learn to create a powerful habit for success; and
  • The story behind the founding of the Heart Cell Foundation

Visit Jenifer Rosenberg OBE’s foundation website www.heartcellsfoundation.com

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Be part of our Facebook Group Big Business Events Members Network

Connect with me on Instagram @adamstottcoach

Transcript:

Please note this is a verbatim transcription from the original audio and therefore may include some minor grammatical errors.

Adam Stott:

Hi everybody, Adam Stott here. Thanks for checking out my podcast Business Growth Secrets, you’re absolutely in the right place. This podcast is going to reveal to you all of the secrets that you’ve been looking to discover. They’re going to allow you to cure your cash flow problems by signing more clients, bring in more leads for your business, and create systems and processes that give you the growth that you want. You are going to discover the Business Growth secrets you have been looking for. I’ve used to sell over 15 million pounds worth of products and services on social media and help clients everywhere to grow their businesses on the mark. So that’s how I got started on the Business Growth Secrets podcast.

Everybody and welcome to this very special episode of Business Growth Secrets. I’m joined today by OBE Jenifer Rosenberg, who had an award that was awarded an OBE for services to business, she runs an amazing charity. Now she’s been a very successful lady throughout her career, and I’m really excited to get to know her more, and ask some questions and help the audience of course today with some business growth secrets. So welcome on, Jenifer, really pleased to have you here.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Thank you very much, Adam. And you know, you have the pleasure of organizing my first podcast. I’m now becoming part of the 21st century.

Adam Stott:

You said that to me earlier, your first ever ones.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

My first ever exclusive. 

Adam Stott:

Absolutely and the best hopefully. We’ll come on and really get to know you, and your background and your history in that you won, you got awarded your OBE for your services to business, you’ve had a career and a career in one of the most famous UK brands, Marks and Spencers. And really wanted to get to know a bit about you and a bit about your background and where you started from, how you came to create some of the success that you created. So where did everything start for you, if you take us back a little bit, Jenifer.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

A long time back to the beginning of the six years. And I love school, but I was not an academic. And in those days, if you wanted to go to university, the options were quite limited, and they really didn’t work for me. So, I left school at 16. And I managed to get a job working for Marks and Spencer in their big offices in Baker Street. And I started off in the post, there was no other way. No other place for me to go. And that’s where I started to see my post every day up and down those corridors

Adam Stott:

Did you really? Wow. And what would you say about yourself? What differentiates you from obviously working your way up? What was that journey? Like? What did you do next? Where do we go? What was the kind of journey?

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Interesting, you should ask that question. Because when I went for the interview at Marks and Spencer in the fall, I’d taken my table and oh, let them know. I went probably about March/April. And I met the stuff they weren’t human resources, then it was staff management, this charming lady. And she said, you know, when you’re interviewing for a job in the post, I suggest that’s not what I said, that’s not really how I want to be. So she said this is the 16 year old telling this woman a vast experience. I said, “well, I really want to be a buyer”. Oh, she said, “Well, that doesn’t happen very often”. I said, “Well, it’s got to happen to someone”. And I feel that’s my career path. That’s where I’m planning to set my sights. So, I got very good results.

My life started in September. I was told I was only here and I had to spend two weeks in the country when I was getting promoted to the accounts department. That’s how my career took off. I was quite lucky in the accounts department because in that department, they were responsible for guess pushing, dealing with all the checks that had to be paid to suppliers and customers whatever. And there had to be two board signatures on every check. One was the company set down mom’s address. So somebody had to go around to get a check sign because I was young and pretty. I was selected. So you may say what you make capital on the situation. And no, I was very fortunate that doors opened and it was a great place to work. 

Adam Stott:

So why were you full of confidence? Sounds to me like from a very young age. You were full of confidence. 

Jenifer Rosenberg:

I think I would always say my mother was probably the original Tiger mother. My mother was very strong. I mean, I never was allowed to have a day of school. You just didn’t have a day of school. It was adoption, you know, you went to school, whatever. No, she had great vision. And while she was a wonderful mom, she’s always there for us. And we went to dancing school, we went to drama school, we did ballet, all and numerous.

Remember, I was born during the war 1942. So all these things were happening just after the war, when things weren’t that readily available. I mean, if you look at any of the old films from the 40s, or 50s, London, all the cities in the UK were impoverished. We had rationing. It was just, but my mother made sure. I went all the right. And I think when you do these things, a chart, it gives you a lot of confidence.

Adam Stott:

Interesting that you actually said what you just said, I’m working with a lady that runs a franchise. So I know she’s a podcast listener. She’s a franchise school called Razzamataz. And she’s often talked to me about her confidence in dance and theater. And those types of arts actually instill in the children. You know, give them better communications, buying as well as a young girl who’s very confident always says, what do you put that down? So she always says that it literally is a drama. The theater is getting out. Really, really feels like a concert. Very interesting. It’s a good tip for, you know, anyone that’s listening, it’s got children, the better way to bring their children on and give them a good, good start. So after you what’s in the bounce department, what happened? You started moving forward, then… 

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Yes, I was getting very bored. Every time I got my appraisal, I would always say, Well, where am I going next? So from there, it was kind of interesting, powerfactory, although I didn’t realize it. So from accounts, I then went to distribution. And that meant I was getting inside the nub of things, because that’s where all the merchandise used to get distributed to all the stores. So I was in the skirts and blouses department. So I was distributing this merchandise. And we have to select what we would send and everything so I was getting closer to my goal.

Adam Stott:

Wow. And it’s really interesting that you said in every appraisal, you said, where am I going next? And it just seemed like that almost, you know, a good brazenness and confidence just kept you pushing forward, which is what it’s all about.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Another tip my mother always used was to make sure I was perfectly dressed. I mean, obviously when I went to school, we had school uniforms. But because she had her view, her thoughts were not thoughts. Her view was that the first impression, the impression that you create, when you walk through the door is the most important impression. You’ve got that moment for a couple of seconds. And if you look good, they will remember you if you look a mess. It doesn’t work. It may work today, but it didn’t work.

Adam Stott:

Yes. Really good. set their dress for success for sure.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

That’s great. Oh, I like that dress. Really awesome. That’s great. That’s great. I’m sure that in your field, you come across people, you know the person that looks presentable and is presenting yourself.

Adam Stott:

Well,  it’s a little bit of a lost start. I must admit that in my career, I worked in the automotive industry. And then as I was working for us working at Ford, then on to BMW and you really wearing it, you were suited everyday, it was all about new suits, smart looking the bar. But then when you come out of that kind of environment, you find that a lot of entrepreneurs are done, dress for success, never dressed very casually. Now, to the events, I want to look smart. I want to make a good impression. It’s on point because people take you more seriously. And you command more respect from the beginning, don’t you?

Jenifer Rosenberg:

When you walk in that door they have to. And that’s so important to get that moment.

Adam Stott:

Absolutely. So moving forward, then we fast forward a little bit. What happened? Why do you feel where you get to the point, where you start taking control of situations and sites and lead people at that transition.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

That took place because then after I left district distribution, I then went into the accessory department and then I was taken out of that and put into the skirt department and when I went into the skirt department, that’s when I really felt this is what I wanted to do. I was given a range of merchandise. I was in charge of that range of merchandise. And I was responsible for presenting what we were going to buy on it following the sales through. And so I suppose I was trying to work out how old I would have been. I suppose I was about 23/24 And then my position grew in that skirt.

You see it also coincides with what was happening in London suddenly it was the swinging 60s. You’re waiting around. But probably your mother’s too young to remember. But suddenly everything happened in London, we had the beef, we had Carnaby Street. And we had this item called a miniskirt. And I was very fortunate. 

I know, but very strongly in the skirt department that we should look at shorter skirts because I could see what was happening. I was out and about. And I always remember Tony the chairman at the time when I presented this skirt to him. And I’m quite sure you can’t see. So I’m sitting down, when I put a 16 inch skirt up against me, it didn’t look too short. So he said, “Okay”. And in those days, they used to call us by our surname. So my name the beings are pursuing. Yes, we’ll try. We’ll try 50. Just because we always bought everything in dozens of them. So that’s like 600 steps.

Well, they went out, and they just walked off the counters. They were so fast. We just and that was the start of this whole new look in the scope department. Really, how I was so fortunate to be part of it. And my career just spiraled up non stop. So in London, you have to understand London, we had the war, the war, and then the 50s were dark and gray. London was being rebuilt. It was totally impoverished. We still had rations I mentioned. Then suddenly the sixes and there’s this explosion, explosion, and everything’s happening in London. You know, we’ve got [00:11:36-00:11:40], the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, it was just so exciting. And we had M&S miniskirts, but it didn’t get better.

Adam Stott:

So where did you get so really that one, that opportunity I will often talk about, you know, pivotal moments are one chance, one opportunity one moment can really change the course and the direction. And so he had this big hit within the skirting department. And that came from you being you know, having really good situational awareness. I suppose another thing I talked about is situational awareness, being aware of your surroundings, being aware, happening, being able to spot the train.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Very, very important because, you know, you didn’t have the internet at all, you didn’t have it. You knew what you saw, or you saw in a magazine or you saw on a television, and you didn’t have all the channels? You know, you were very limited in your communication, your means of communications very limited.

Adam Stott:

Absolutely. That situation when it’s got that big break, and where do we go? We said your career skyrockets. How do we end up? You know, starting in the Polish room and going on to get an OBE, you know, for your services, that business is an incredible story.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

I’m giving you a little snapshot version of it. But the incredible thing is that I loved everything I’ve done. I loved working with M&S, I was so happy to be in the latest world. So happy and to accept all the exciting new things that were happening. I mean, we had another success story with trousers with fit and flare pants, they didn’t have a traveling Geminus.

So I was selected to develop a trouser range. On my own, I could use whichever manufacturers I wanted. And I did it. And that was another success. It was just so successful. Because the country was hungry for new things. It’s not like it is today with all the choice in the selection of the merchandise. It’s brought in from overseas. Everything was made in the UK. All the fabrics were sourced in the UK. It was just very exciting. Absolutely. And the other interesting thing was that you talked about communication, the senior board, M&S knew who we were, they were in our offices every other day, looking at the merchandise seeing what’s happening, have we bought enough? It was so hands on it was somebody

Adam Stott:

And that’s, you know, really important. Perhaps it doesn’t sound like things don’t happen. Now within certainly large companies.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

No, they don’t but this was a large company at the time. And we have more offices in Baker Street and we have mobile apps stored at the bottom of the road and the ball we’re in there all the time talking to the customer seeing what’s selling what do you want? It was wonderful. I found it an amazing experience to have to see all this happening and I learned so much from it.

Adam Stott:

And you have to just stay there for how long have you got cheap working within that?

Jenifer Rosenberg:

I left the M & S. I left when I was 30. So I was there for 14 years.

Adam Stott:

Okay, awesome. And when you were so near the end of your time there, what would you say were your biggest successes? Obviously you’ve had the success of launching the products. Where did you start to lead other people and start to be in the position of adding you get nominated for your awards and things that you want.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

When I got nominated for my awards when I left M&S. I was running my own business, but while I was at M&S, we always had a team of young people working under you. You knew that you had to teach them and train them. There was a, it wasn’t a spell line of training, but it was a line trade. You have these young people. Sometimes, you know, when I was actually the senior selector, or the senior buyer of the search department, I had a team of about 12 people working on it. And I was still not even searching.

I found this: the other thing that happened, you know, things I keep remembering. With this new advent of fashion, what was happening in London, the senior board looked at certain buying departments like the blouse department, the dress, the pants and skirt department, and whatever, and they felt they wanted to have a new look. They wanted new faces and younger people. So gradually the more mature buyers retired. When we were young, we were kids, we were in our trenches, running these departments, which if you think about the board, were amazing to put so much confidence in ours. 

Adam Stott:

Absolutely. I mean, they clearly say that you are moving in the right direction.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

I equally think that we all had wonderful training there. Yeah, we weren’t just plucked off a tree. We’ve been in the various departments and we’ve been trained and we understood, we understood. merchandise, we understood the way M&S worked, and we connect, we communicate.

Adam Stott:

I think it’s really important. The one thing I think is important is, it doesn’t matter how old somebody is, it matters whether they got the ability to do the job. And I think that’s really, really important. I remember that time in my career where I felt like I was passed over because I was too young, but I was capable enough. And I think if somebody is capable, they are given the opportunity, right? Sounds like they did.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Interesting how because they knew who we were, they’d seen and they would come into the buying departments, at least twice a week, so they knew who lives on and they could see what was out and equally how we were dressing. Yeah, because you know, we always look smart. And they will be with us. 

Adam Stott:

Yeah. Awesome. So when you went on to leave M&S. What happens now in your career?

Jenifer Rosenberg:

I decided to leave M&S because my personal life was changing and didn’t work. I was involved with an m&s manufacturer, because a supplier he was a very large firm. And it wasn’t working with me working there. He being a manufacturer, so I chose to I left when I left. He came my husband wanted me to have something to do. So he started a little factory for me. He was an MD of a big public company, which you probably won’t know now, to buy and sell imports. And he’s a major m&s supplier, but he thought he gave me something to do to keep me busy.

I’ve been… So I obviously missed them and because it was a big part of my life. But then I was very fortunate that I was able then to supply them and so I became a supplier to reminisce about a little factory in the Northeast of England in walls and making pledges for Marks & Spencer, lovely. And the wonderful thing was that m&s Were very happy to support me because they felt that there was no way I continued to work at m&s, but they didn’t want to lose what I could offer them and what skills I had, so they were very happy to support my business supplying.

Adam Stott:

And it’s always a good lesson in itself for a lot of people that, you know, work for a business, realizing that actually, when you leave that business relationship doesn’t always have to end. Actually. A lot of people overlook that. And if you leave on the balance circumstance, you’re not going to get a raise, but…

Jenifer Rosenberg:

I tell you something, even when I left, they gave me a golden handshake. I was 30 years old, I was still so young, I was going off to start my own business and they gave me a golden handshake. It doesn’t get better than that. 

Adam Stott:

No, absolutely. That’s awesome, isn’t it? 

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Yeah, it is awesome. I couldn’t believe it. When they gave me the check. I was just, you know, they were just such a wonderful company. 

Adam Stott:

You speak very calmly and were really so respectful of them. As you talk, you speak very friendly.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

I do. I had at one time that I absolutely loved everyone. And you know, I’m friends with so many of my friends who used to work there. We’re all still friends. It’s lovely. 

Adam Stott:

So in terms of growing your business. And you said you will go on to achieve great success in this business. What does that look like for you? What actually happened? In the growth of your business? How did you find running a business? You’ve had this career, we’ve had a lot of support, you worked in a great environment. Now you’re doing your own thing? 

Jenifer Rosenberg:

What’s that like for you? Well, that became, personally, very difficult. Because I went from being a general, Jenifer’s senior selector or senior buyer lady separates them with a budget of about 50 million, which was a fortune then coming back to being…

Adam Stott:

Back now, right.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

So right, but then becoming, you know, a manufacturer, employing about 12 people, then you found somebody they didn’t really want to talk to, you are very important. So it was a big turnaround. But he also something I just like to mention, we open this factory in January 1974, which is when we had a free day, we, we had the miners strike them, companies were only allowed to operate three days a week, when you can imagine, you’ve got enough business acumen to know that you’re starting a brand new business and can only operate half a week.

Not good. But we survived. We survived. And we just grew the business. I mean, I was very fortunate. I was always in an age where I only ever manufactured. And the business in the Northeast grew, we finished up with 12 factories in the northeast and North share. And at one point, you know, we employ over 3000 people. 

Adam Stott:

So you took a small business to 3000 people in 12 factories is super success, right? And what were some of the what tips would you give some of the people listening some because I have a lot of people that listen, in fashion, I have a lot of people in fast fashion, a lot of people in you know, retail, all sorts of different things, you know, and also the fact that your female entrepreneur thinks really inspiring as well as the ability to 3000 people, a lot of the time people look for more that we need more female entrepreneurs is what I’m trying to say.

You know, I think it’s really important, especially to speak up and talk about their journey. So what were some of the things that you learned along the way? What are some of the things you would say about running a business for you? What’s really important rules of success for Jenifer Rosenberg?

Jenifer Rosenberg:

I think you actually have to have a good team as well. I’m a team. I mean, I can’t do everything myself. Nobody, I have to have good finances. And I can delegate but I don’t have to pay. I think that’s so important. So important. And I think very fortunately for people on my team, I’m very..

Adam Stott:

Very delegate not abdicate looks like you mean, you delegate, you still monitor and measure the result? Absolutely. And you do that consciously. So like, right.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

I mean, we used to, you know, when business was really big. We used to have a meeting every Monday, a sales meeting with all the designers and sales team and everything. That was about 2030 and I used to have a chart or Bible. And every single style that we were producing, the whole company was monitored. And I always went through to find out exactly where that was every single week, and whether it was whether there were problems there but different. I allowed everybody to run their department, but equally I had to notice going on.

Adam Stott:

Which is really important, right? This would be for a successful delegate, but don’t advocate and resolve things for 3000 people? Well, that’s a lot of people to manage, Jenifer.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Yeah, there’s something that I myself, I just I mean, and no, I had a great team. And I’m always somebody that if there’s a problem, I always know there’s going to be a solution. I’m a very positive person, I’m not negative. So I don’t can’t deal with negativity, I hate it. So I’m a very positive person. And for me, there’s always…

Adam Stott:

And some of you say you’re very positive, but I agree on the same. How do you feel that’s instilled in you? Because for a lot of people, it’s just not natural. You know, they don’t but you have to work. I know, I’ve worked on it by interviewing a lot of people. And I’ve worked with a lot of people. I speak to a lot of high level people. And I think that that’s a common trait to be more of a positive mindset. But where do you think that comes from? From fear, that positive mindset?

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Well, I think almost it comes down to [00:25:04-00:25:09]

Adam Stott:

That’s right, we can…

Jenifer Rosenberg:

[00:25:12-00:25:15] Yeah, if we come from the fact that we also feel confident, you know, I said to you before, I was very confident as a child. And I think this sees you through big time. And I mean, I cannot I, as I say, I hate negativity. I’m a very positive person. I really, really am. And I always look at the pluses in this situation. And a minus. Yeah. I mean, if you’ve seen we’ve gone through this COVID. I mean, come on, we’ve had two years of this pandemic that we’ve never, ever experienced before.

And I thought to myself, how am I going to deal with this, because it was time that I was living in my own apartment here in London, and I hate my own company. And I like to be busy. So I thought, I’ve got to make myself into this every day, every single day, or every night before I go to bed, I make myself while I’m going to do the next day, so that I got a structure and a plan to my day, I can’t just wake up in the morning and sit and do nothing, I can’t do it.

Adam Stott:

And that’s something that’s a very simple thing that all successful people do. Oh, yeah, I was told that. You know, when I worked at Ford, one of the first things I did was very unorganized. And I had a great manager there, his name was Michael. And the first thing he said to me is Adam, right? This is going to give you one habit. This is the habit, he said, “You are not allowed to leave this show, unless you write a list of exactly what you are going to do tomorrow.

So you can get in at 6am. And you can write the list, but I don’t care. You don’t start the day without a plan”. And he gave me that, I’ll see what that’s simply a simple thing. She empowers you so much, because powerfully What did you say? And so write down the three big things you’re gonna accomplish each day. If you write down three big things, you’ll always accomplish straight over 300. But you can call.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Absolutely. So I think I’ve always had that mindset, and particularly with the pandemic, because I thought to myself, I’m not going to have a list and a plan each day. It won’t happen about what I did. I made it work.

Adam Stott:

Absolutely. Did you in the end find that to be a productive period for you? I mean, I’m interested.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

We did and sure I did the same as everybody. I did massive decluttering traffic out drawers. I did a beautiful jigsaw puzzle, I do jigsaw puzzles, which I find very therapeutic, I like one that was so beautiful. I’ve had it framed. Um, what else? Obviously we watch television or read. So you know, somehow, I tried to use the time.

Adam Stott:

 Absolutely. In terms of successes in your career, what would you say are the most successful, obviously building the company having 3000 people, you’ve got given an OBE for this, right?

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Because we were based, mainly, most of the factories are based in the Northeast of England. And I got it because the unemployment levels are so bad that I got this OBE for services to industry because that was such an incredible day. I didn’t realize how amazing it would be till the moment we drove through those gates at Buckingham Palace. Suddenly that it’s just unbelievable and I was very fortunate I was given my award by the Queen. And it’s just I can’t remember every moment that day still, it was just fantastic. 

Adam Stott:

It was a lovely way to offer a wonderful business and wonderful careers. That acknowledgement in that way is down to charity. They must talk about that as well. And to make a difference. And I know that this is something that’s not the plan, but I know you’ve actually had this. You know, so, do you want to tell us a little bit about that?

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Well, my late husband developed a very bad heart condition. And we went to see his specialty. This is now 2003 and he’s given me weeks to live. It seems so bad. He’s got something called heart failure and it’s really bad. But then his, we went back to see the specialist and he said that he says a young cardiologist working from Bartholomew’s Hospital has just given a paper on this treatment that’s happening in Germany where you take a patient’s own stem cells, and you inject them back into their damaged heart and it starts to regenerate that damage.

So this was quite mind blowing because I’ve never heard of stem cells and this is something totally new to me. Anyway, there was a professor at the Frankfurt University Hospital and was doing this research program where we were interested so the next thing my husband and I went off to Frankfurt with the cardiologist without actually making that we’d only just met. And we go and my husband has incredible treatment. 

It gave him three years that were just amazing years. And when we got back to London, he was so upset when there was no money in the UK for this research, it was just money that wasn’t available. He decided that he would start a wave and start a charitable foundation to raise the money to allow this treatment to be available to everybody across the UK. So he was very dynamic. My husband had so much energy. And when he found out that we would need six or they would need 6 million pounds to conduct this trial. He says about raising and we did. We had a big launch at the Mansion House, Esther Rantzen is one of our big patrons and supporters. She was there. And we started a campaign to raise the money.

Adam Stott:

It’s amazing.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

The trials we did, but yeah, we raised 6 million pounds. The first patient got treated in 2005 and it’s been ongoing since and to date we’ve treated over 400 patients. And now we have a dedicated compassionate team at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, which is ongoing, we treat patients on an ongoing basis. And now we’re planning another fundraising campaign to raise another 8 million pounds. Because we want to conduct a bigger trial, which is that trial reacts the way the previous trials have reacted, we’ll be able to offer this to the National Health across the country.

Adam Stott:

[00:32:09-00:32:11]

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Of course, it doesn’t say heart, heart, you know when you’ve just mentioned…  You know, heart disease is the biggest killer in this country. And it doesn’t just kill mature people. It kills young people as…

Adam Stott:

He was 52, wasn’t he?

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Absolutely. So yeah, so as I say, when we are financing the compassionate, ongoing, and now we’re starting to pay 8 million pound campaign to start a new, bigger, bigger trial, which will hopefully will get approved, which is the NHS commissioning medical committee, and then we’ll be able to roll it out across the UK. So we’ll be able to save even more lives.

Adam Stott:

Amazing. So how can people support this charity? Where can they go for their charity?

Jenifer Rosenberg:

They can go to our website, which is heartcellsfoundation.com. We have an excellent page where you can go and see previous patients that have been treated here and their case studies which are wonderful. You can donate. And I mean, if we have anybody listening that would like to support us, a million pounds….

Adam Stott:

Nobody knows, right?

Jenifer Rosenberg:

No. Well, we didn’t before. And if you think 6 million in 2004 is a lot more than 8 million now.

Adam Stott:

Yeah. And the other reality is your health is your wealth. Your health is your who I have all the money in the world.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Good health. And the interesting thing with this treatment is simple. It’s not an operation. You extract your own stem cells from your bone marrow. And then they get purified, then you inject them back into your damaged heart and your heart regenerates. That’s amazing, isn’t it? It is amazing. It really, really is. And of course this research is being used with stem cells for many other illnesses as well. It’s being used for the liver, for macular degeneration in the eye as a whole cross section of areas it’s being treated for and yeah.

Adam Stott:

I’m excited to really be proud of how long you have been involved in the chapter that you’ve been running in the chair?

Jenifer Rosenberg:

We started it in ‘04. So where are we now? 14/18 years, 18 years? Wow. You’ve chosen the medical people who think it’s so quick. I think it’s taken forever, but they think no, we’ve got there so quick.

Adam Stott:

Shows you how much effort it really requires to take…

Jenifer Rosenberg:

These leads and go that I’m not measured at all. The medical team, our habits and rooms are amazing. My professor and team are doing a wonderful job. I also have a great team of trustees who really, as I say, I’m a team player. As long as I’m leading I’m okay.

Adam Stott:

You’re a team leader. Well, great, can you just say the website again that people can go and check.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

The website is heartcellsfoundation.com.

Adam Stott:

Yeah, absolutely. Go and check it out. heartcellsfoundation.com for really, really great calls. Jenifer Rosenberg on the state, you’ve been absolutely amazing. Congratulations on all your success and your results. And thank you for coming on doing your first ever podcast, Jenifer, your story.

Jenifer Rosenberg:

 I’m gonna write this in my diary. Now. My first podcast.

Adam Stott:

Ah, brilliant. Good stuff. But thanks for listening. 

Jenifer Rosenberg:

Thank you.

Adam Stott:

Ready, go and give us a five star review on Business Growth Secrets, Apple, Spotify, wherever you’re listening to make sure you subscribe. So you can see more brilliant interviews from brilliant people like Jenifer, where we share the secrets of building businesses and business. Very good. Thank you, everyone, for joining today. 

Hi, everybody, Adam here. And I hope you love today’s episode. Hope you thought it was fabulous. And if you did, I’d like to ask you a small favor. Could you jump over and go and give the podcast a review. Of course, I’ll be super grateful. That is a five star review with putting our all into this podcast for you, delivering you the content, giving you the secrets.

And if you’ve enjoyed it, please go and give us a review and talk about what your favorite episode is perhaps every single month, I select someone from that review list to come to one of my exclusive Academy days and have lunch with me on the day meeting hundreds of my clients so you want that to be you. then you’re going to be in with a shout if you go and give us a review on iTunes. Please of course do remember to subscribe so you can get all the up to date episodes. Peace and love and I’ll see you very very soon. Thank you.

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